podcast

sleon productions Podcast 2020 Midseason Compilation

2020 Mid-Season Compilation with Terry Ogburn from Ogburn’s Business Solutions, Grant Parr from GameFace Performance, Coach Arnie Fonseca, Nancy E. Head author of Restoring the Shattered: Illustrating Christ’s Love Through the Church in One Accord, and Oleg Lougheed from Overcoming Odds.

Terry Ogburn
https://terryogburn.com/
Check out Terry’s video:
https://amzn.to/2NDRYMK

Grant Parr
Book: The Next One Up Mindset: How To Prepare For The Unknown 
https://amzn.to/2GmF2qQ

Coach Arnie Fonseca
https://www.totalrecoveryarizona.com/about

Nancy E. Head
https://amzn.to/3bRiCwh

Oleg Lougheed
https://www.overcomingodds.today/

Transcript

Santiago Leon
Hello, hello. This is the sling on productions Podcast, where we interview business entrepreneurs, people related in business and the technology sector and we give you great content but also great value to inspire you on your goals and your values. Today we have a special guest, Harry ogburn. He is the owner of og burns isn’t solutions. He has helped a business development process that helps entrepreneurs and owners business owners learn the importance of working on your business instead of being caught up in the day to day grind. His unique system and personal hoshin to the development of others has contributed to the success of hundreds of small to large business venture. And we got Terry on the show to the Selena productions podcast.

Terry Ogburn
Thank you Santiago. I appreciate you very much.

Santiago Leon
Fox found you through another podcast. And when I first listened to you, it was a subject that I really was getting into and really are interested and is having systems in your business.

Terry Ogburn
Exactly.

Santiago Leon
And of course, I read your biography but can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Terry Ogburn
Sure, be glad to go. Growing up I was a military brat and most people refer to us as brat, you know, but but people don’t maybe not understand breath means born and raised and transferred. So you grew up in the, like, I grew up in the air force. I was just like, like that I you know, got orders I was moved. I was transferred just like the the rest of the family was. But it does it did. You know, enable my dad to put good work ethics in us and you know, military background and things like that. So growing up in business, I I got fired out of the car business. And so I decided to open my own air conditioning company like most technicians do, you know, most people are not allowed to get mad at the boss and all open up something, you know, just go up again. And I never understood how much it went into building a business. But fortunately for me, I had a lot of mentors, I was able to develop mentorships and things like that. And they helped me understand the importance of working on your business. And then I was introduced to books like the E myth revisited and things like you know, books that teach you that type of stuff. And so then it just became natural to me to create systems and processes, and things that help you organize your business, so you can work on it so you have more freedom to be in. I’m like most of when I was in the air conditioning business. I was probably like most of your young entrepreneurs out there working 10 1214 hours a day, never seen seem to make have enough time to get everything done that you need to get done. And you just get to the end of the week and you’re exhausted and I often described like a, like a hamster wheel. You know, you get on this hamster wheel, you work, you work work, you step off and you say, Oh, I got to get back on it, you know. So I’m teaching people how to work on their business became a part of my life and I developed processes and standards that can work and I worked for companies like Radio Shack did turnaround stores for them. I took a company public was one of the five people that was brought in from the startup at a kitchen table. And you can imagine what it would take to go through all the way to an IPO. That took us two and a half years, we invested about $5 million dollars and we sold it for $30 million. It’s not a bad return on your investment for two and a half years worth of work. So a lot of education or a lot of my systems, they work in big companies century 21. Better Call paging, at&t Wireless, a lot of big companies and in 2005 I decided to start my own and I knew it was going to be small businesses that turn the country around. Got it back on its feet. So I just focused on that segment of the market. And that’s what I’ve done now for the last 15 years.

Santiago Leon
Yeah, I was seeing your profile that you work with Radio Shack 18 T, and it’s something that many people don’t understand, like in a business, you need systems. How important is to have a system in your business?

Terry Ogburn
To me, it’s everything from the time you know, how you want your people to clock in or how you you need a policy Procedures Manual, you need job descriptions, and some some of your listeners out there said, well, Terry, I’m too small. No, no, it doesn’t matter how big or how small you are. If there’s an account if you have to do accounts payables, you know, if you have to pay bills, that’s called accounts payables and you can go online you can think figure out what an accounts payable person does, match it to what you’re supposed to be doing. And Wallah, you have a job description for accounts payable, accounts receivable, cook bottle washer, it does Doesn’t matter. But if you’re all of them, then you have to know what those those tasks represent, you need to know that you also need to know like with me, I turned my organizational chart upside down, meaning the customer is the boss. And that’s a whole different system that I’ve come to learn over the time. And you know yourself. If a customer asks you like one of my companies is marine Max, and I tell them all the time, if a customer walks in and wants a yellow boat with a green, bimini top, you’re gonna make it happen. So why don’t you just go ahead and let them be the Boston and then just treat them like the boss walked in the room when they came in to your to your store or whatever?

Santiago Leon
Can you name a quarterback know professionally that you seen that maybe have gone behind in the game, but you could tell that he had the right mindset to get back in the game that he’s able to overcome? Uh, can you name a few examples or maybe just one quarterback that you really see a lot that has come back?

Grant Parr
Well, yeah, I mean, and I’m going to say Because I’m a Buffalo Bills fan, which is kind of an anomaly being in here in the West and the bay area on the West Coast here. Everyone’s a Niner fan here. But when you think about what was it in the 90s, when the bills were playing the Oilers in the in the championship game before the Super Bowl, and when Jim Kelly got hurt, and he was right before the third or fourth quarter, Frank Wright was a backup quarterback, they didn’t have a lot of playing time. And I believe the score was 31 to three or 33 to three. And so there was just a quarter left and and Frank Reich came back who is now the head coach with the Colts he came back and basically put the team on his back and beat the Oilers and then went to the Super Bowl. So yeah, talk about the next one up, you know, the next man up to sitting there all season long. playing against, you know, playing behind the franchise quarterback Jim Kelly hardly getting any reps. And that guy steps into one of his biggest games and access if he’s been playing all season long.

Santiago Leon
Yeah, that’s something that I really do see in sports, you know, where you have the right mindset, even though it feels like is the end of the world, you know, you’re down 38 to nothing. And but there’s a possibility that you could come back and overcome it and win the game. It could be by a vehicle, or by a touchdown. That’s something that definitely look at quarterbacks. In your book. You mentioned about your system, MVP. Can you tell the audience a little bit about that?

Grant Parr
Yeah, MVP stands for doing your daily MVP. It’s meditation, visualization and powerful self talk. And basically what this strategy does, it’s a good strategy to connect the mind and the body. So before you’re going into practice, before you go into any kind of performance or competition, what you’re truly doing is you’re getting your mind and your body connected. And you’re what you’re doing is you’re you’re kidding yourself. wrath you’re getting into your breath, you’re getting to where your feet are, and you’re getting into a very meditative state. And you’re starting to as you lock in your energy, you work your energy all the way down your body, with your breath, then you start to visualize whatever you want, you know, whatever that you’re going to, that you want to perform our sixth season. And then you’re going to end that whole breathing, meditative state with talking like saying words that are going to get you motivated and inspired. And that’s going to take you into a positive direction. And so when you go through that whole MVP process, man, you’re, you’re going to be your own VP, who doesn’t want to be their most valuable player, right? So when you actually do that meditation, the visualization, the power for self talk, when you’re putting everything back into your control, and you’re connecting your mind and your body.

Santiago Leon
Of course, you have, you know, clients are athletes and also for mathletes. And a career for an athlete. It could be you know, 10 to 20 years sometimes, like way less, you know, what do you teach Athletes when they transition into a private citizen, I guess you can say,

Grant Parr
yeah, it’s huge, I think transition at any level. It’s it’s a real thing. There’s a lot of times where people put everything into their identity, and they don’t go on beyond high school. And so how do they deal with that transition? And to be honest with you, I work a lot with athletes, you know, on their craft on their mental game. But I do work on an element of knowing they need to know who they are, who are you outside of sport. And so if I can get you to do that, while you’re in sport, because what you like playing football is what you do, it’s not who you are. And so we explore a lot of different areas of how we actually can identify who we are. Because when we play sport, sometimes most of the time, we let go of who we are, so we can actually commit ourselves to this role, this this athlete, and then we have to go commit ourselves back to who we are. So the more that we have that good relationship that when it’s time to Leave the sport. We’ve already we’ve already gone through that whole process of knowing who we are. Now the fun thing is getting these athletes excited like you get to trance transition out of sport. Like I know you have to or you feel like you’re getting pushed out or, or your your you know your time’s expired, whatever it is or your injury. But you have to look at a transition as I get to do this.

Santiago Leon
What do you think is going on? in the mind of Tom Brady right now? Do you think he’s in that? Like on the ropes of like, he might retire or do you think he’s athletes? Like No, I’m looking beyond I am gonna play zone 45 what do you think is going on in his mind right now?

Grant Parr
Personally, I think he’s there’s a lot of talk about him right now. And I think he will. He’s, he’s, he’s embracing all of this. He’s embracing he wants to play he’s gonna play whether if it’s going to be another year to two years if he plays more than that. Awesome. Good for him. Right. But I think he wants to prove the world that he still got And he does. He does. I mean, whether if he’s gonna perform like he has five years ago, we don’t know. He hasn’t had the best weapons around him. But again, I think he’s he’s loving this. He wants to prove everybody that he’s still got it.

Santiago Leon
Of course, at the time of this recording, Eli Manning has announced his retirement. What would you tell Eli Manning, if you spoke to him right now?

Grant Parr
Uh, man if I spoke to him right now, I’d be like giving him a high five and a big hug. I’d be like, it mean, you’ve he’s he’s done a lot of great things. And I think this is where you reflect. I mean, there’s a lot of things that as an athlete, you need to reflect on your performances, practices in games, so you can get better. I call that work on build on that whole process. But when you’re actually transitioning out, this is where you actually look back, reflect and really embrace all the love the joy, everything thing that you’ve done. And if you need to go back and reflect on some, you know, bad games negativity, so you can get lessons and do that. But if not, reflect on it, rejoice in it and then get ready for a new life. And he said, He’s got so many things he’s going to get into. But I would just give him a big hug and congratulate him because he did some incredible things. I mean, he should be proud of himself.

Santiago Leon
So coach Arnie, obviously, I mean, for me, in my eyes, it feels like the coaching industry has become popular in the last couple years. Why is that? Obviously, why is it so popular lately?

Arnie Fonseca
Well, because people want help, but people are also looking for shortcuts. And I’m okay with both of those things. But sometimes the shortcuts aren’t the best way. Because you still got to work hard. And if a coach is promising you to get you from A to Z without missing a few steps in the middle, it’s kind of like doing algebra. I taught high school algebra for five years. And the reason that everybody hates algebra, right? Yeah. And what are the things I used to teach the kids say, look, here’s why algebra is important. Because it teaches you steps. And you might get the first step, right. But if you miss the second step, then even though you do all the work in Step three, and four perfectly, you missed the problem. Because you missed a step. And that’s kind of how life is Santiago. You know, it is takes shortcuts. At some point, it’s going to catch up with you. And so my problem with some of the young coaches and God bless them, because, you know, we’ve had this around when I was a 22 year old, 23 year old Yeah, exactly. But at the same time, we didn’t have this. I’m an I’m going to be a life coach, and there’s nothing wrong with it. Essentially, if you’re teaching, like how to do stuff in computer and tech and stuff that I don’t even understand But when you get to the life that stretch. So at the same time, I think it’s important because there’s a friend of mine, his name is Jay Elliott. And this guy, he’s we have him on a team because I’m actually working on an app. I think I might have told you this. And Jay Elliott is on our board. And Jay Elliott was the mentor to Steve Jobs. He used to work at IBM and jobs meta meta coffee shop back in the early 80s. And they just started talking, he was he was probably want to say 20, maybe 1520 years older. And jobs, try to convince him to come over to Apple and then with IBM doing well, until jobs basically convinced him that two jobs was that you need to come over here and you need money. My guy, my mentor, my life coach, even though coaching hadn’t really been turned yet because Robin says one day that turnout to it, but so he came over and he would he was with jobs at Apple until jobs got let go by the the board. But he was, you know, basically he was a guy that jobs went to for advice. And so, you know, coaching, if it’s strategics and it’s it’s done for the right reasons with somebody that has the right experience can allow you to skip over steps, but you got to know what you’re where you’re going to get there. You know, you just can’t miss things because you’re going to make big mistakes. And I think sometimes an inexperienced coach can create a bigger mistake, because they haven’t seen it. They haven’t seen it. You know? Look, I’m a big fan Santiago that the old mike tyson advice, you need to get punched in the face. Because then you’re going to find out who you are. And if somebody protection from getting punched in the face too much. I think that could be a problem. I did a talk one time many years ago, probably 10 910 years ago. I said don’t wait till you’re 50 kicked in the teeth. That hurts a lot more. The best time to learn how to get punched in the face is as Gary Vee would say is now if you’re in your 20s get hammered around a little bit, get punched around, figure out what you don’t like what you like what works, what doesn’t work, is helping if working with a coach helps you getting burned by a coach helps you great but don’t I wouldn’t personally rely As a young young coach to get you there unless it’s a specific place, like with a maybe in software or in something technical that they really are good at, although, you know, I mean, looking in the NFL, you know, two years ago, even this year, two years ago, a young coach got his team to the Super Bowl, but he got beat by a very experienced coach that basically out coached him. This year, you had another young coach, who got him to the Super Bowl, but he got out coached by a very experienced coach that exposed him.

Arnie Fonseca
So, you know, it is what it is. I’m not making it up, because those are real life experiences. So depending on how you want to spend your dollars, I would be careful on spending it on somebody super inexperienced, and you could be 40 or 50, and be inexperienced. Without having a very specific thing that you want, like a relationship, a business, a book, a software situation, because unless someone’s been there, done that, it’s going to be tougher. I promise you, or they’re going to give you an opportunity to go through it with them. And maybe they’ll give you a break on price. I don’t know. Arnie, I’ve talked to some experienced young coaches and he surprised what they know. It’s pretty pretty amazing.

Santiago Leon
See, when I first heard you and his other podcasts it I mean, I always had a independent spirit, always believe you got to go out there and go to the next level as much as you can. And if for you, it just reinforced what I believed, you know, feels like I was like the only guy that believed around my area. Um, and you your book, you talk a lot about marriage, and can tell us a little bit about that. portion of the book.

Nancy E. Head
Well, that was a, you know, there I was with five children. My baby was seven months old, my oldest had just turned 10 when we found ourselves alone, and three years later, because I wasn’t willing to rush into divorce, I had, honestly, practically speaking, no way to benefit from pursuing that at the time. And I wanted to see if the family could get back together for the sake of the children even though you’re not supposed to talk about that so much anymore. That my husband chose to divorce me and remarry. And the 11 years I spent by myself, I spent at the time it wasn’t a really big thing in churches to have the single the single parents Sunday school class. I was I started The married couples class for years. Because I was married once I got divorced, I felt like I didn’t have a home. And it was a beautiful thing that happened that there was a college and career class. Well, I’m 30 now, and everybody in that class is 24 fish at least. Now I don’t really think I fit better that’s even though you may want on my back to college, I still don’t fit there. And this one friend of mine kept inviting me but please just come back to the merry class. It’s okay, we still love you Please come back. And finally I did. And that really was worth what have you. These people had children, the ages of my children. And there was there was still a lot in common even though I was a single person. Shortly thereafter, they started the single parent, divorced persons Sunday school class. And I felt that I had a greater advantage though because but sometimes I spent my share of time doing this to that single people will sit around and talk about how their lives would be better if they were married, or how nasty their ex husband is. Or, you know, here’s the latest thing that happened to me. And you do need some of that. How let me share my burden with you, you do need that. But my two best friends were both married. And the beauty of that was that, you know, one of my friends, my, I call them my best friends, which I understand. Typically that means one person but I have two. So one of them was dealing with her husband’s chronic illness. And that made her life not very easy, made it very difficult. She became the primary breadwinner for quite a period of time. And, for example, when the state of pencils she was a state employee when the state of Pennsylvania does not pass their budget by June 30. You don’t get paid in one year, six weeks that they went with no paycheck. So just because I was a single mother didn’t mean that my life was harder. than anybody else’s. The other woman who’s my best friend, her husband was police officer. And she watched him put on his Kepler every day and go out and work between 8pm and 4am. and deal with the worst of the things that we’re having. And believe me the worst of the things that were happening in our city at the time. So I do remember also making my wedding dress as I’m approaching remarriage. And I put my dress together and I went over to this friend’s house and I asked her to pin to pin my hem for me, because I knew that she would know how to do it correctly, that it would look right. But I arrived on the evening that she and her husband were having conflict. And as she’s sitting there with pins in her mouth, she’s saying, Are you sure you’re really want to do this again. So I’ve actually thought of that a few times in the ensuing years of her, warning me so to speak, because there’s that tendency as a single person. in a difficult situation to say, here’s my way out. And it’s really your way into a new set of circumstances that might be just as hard, just as challenging, more challenging in some ways. So, you know, you, especially when you’re I was alone for 11 years, I used to being alone, I got used to making decisions that I didn’t have to ask somebody permission or we’d have to sit down and, and work this out with, you know, we have an extra hundred dollars, what are we gonna do with it? It’s like, No, I just decided before, so there was a big adjustment in that. And I think having had married friends as opposed to simply surrounding myself with single people really helped me to see

Nancy E. Head
that you know what, life’s hard the whole way around, and expecting something to come like a magic wand and make everything all better. is probably not realistic. And so when you’re in that difficulty, then later on, you can say yep. And that watching them stick through one of them. My friend whose husband was chronically ill, they’ve been married 45 years. So watching people stick it out like that. And for better for worse, in sickness and in health, and for richer, for poorer, because everybody’s times go up and down. That really makes a difference. And that’s something that that we need to be showing our children whether in I liked that my kids had these places to go and play with other friends where they were seeing a mom and a dad together. So not not everybody gets to see that and I think that’s, that’s crucial that that you put your kids in a position where they get to see other people interacting that way and you know, working the thing out in the kitchen with what are we going to do today or how are we going to do that? How should we handle this situation? And if you spend enough time in somebody else’s house, you’re going to see that kind of situation and you’re going to say, wow, these, these people have something that’s not happening at my house. But Hmm, there’s, there’s a situation that that becomes reality to them. It’s not just something they see on TV, that that appears to just be fantasy.

Santiago Leon
What would you tell your 15 year old self?

Oleg Lougheed
What would I tell my 15 year old self? My 15 year old self, I would say this, and this is a something that I actually posted recently on Facebook and all the other social media platforms. And it stands out to me for many different reasons. But the biggest one is, I firmly believe reminding yourself of different blends and who you are. And the message is this. You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem and smarter than you think. Don’t give away that power within you. I think it any given moment, that’s always there. And in my opinion, it’s always true. Because every single day, when I approach life, it’s really just about learning how to deal with the unknown. I’ll never know enough to make a particular decision. I’ll never know the full story when it comes to making those decisions. But choosing to remind myself that, hey, even though I may not know those things, I already have the skills within me, and the understanding to still keep moving forward. So those messages continue to remind me that, hey, whatever I’m going through, whatever, whatever the challenge, whatever the obstacle, whatever it may be, is that I have the tools within me to get through that thing and to solve it. The time that it may take is a little bit longer. But I think that’s also a true one of the truths about life is that every single thing in life has its own timing. So whatever you envisioned in accomplishing in a day or week For a month, it may take significantly longer, or it may happen in a split second, you just never know.

Santiago Leon
Not giving power away that that is definitely the key thing there and, and you know, keep going, what were your goals are like what is the best way to reach you on line.

Oleg Lougheed
The best way to reach me online is probably the same exact way that you connect connected, and that is through LinkedIn. Now people can also find me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, whatever, maybe. But most of my time is spent on LinkedIn. And the reason why is because I’ve seen incredible benefits from that platform. As far as how people connect and why they choose to connect to begin with. And that makes a big difference for me is that people are looking to connect not only grow professionally, but also personally in different areas. And I’m someone who actively chooses to engage in those elements of growth of one To better understand as far as the topics that we know now. And so LinkedIn is probably the best way for people to get in touch with him,

Santiago Leon
or leg. What a wonderful time I had with you very motivating, very good start for the day, I am motivated to have, you know, to finish strong this Friday, and I am really, really excited to have you any closing words before we end.

Oleg Lougheed
No, the biggest things I want to say is this is I’m extremely grateful for you. I’m grateful for you and your platform, and the different opportunities that it gives for other people to engage with those who are able to be a part of the show. The thing that I want to leave people with is that you’re never alone. You’re never alone along this journey. It is plot platforms like this make it possible for you to experience that feeling that you’re not alone. So if there’s anything that I’d like to pass on to you in particular, is keep doing what you’re doing. Don’t let anyone stop you. from achieving or pursuing your dreams, because you’re already making a difference. And as long as you’re impacting at least one person’s life over the course of your day, in my opinion, Job well done, doesn’t have to be any more than that. And in fact, in this particular conversation, that’s really all we can control, right? Is that person on the other end, we can’t control anyone else’s part of that process. So I just want to say that and encourage you that you will face challenges and obstacles along this journey of continuing to evolve this podcast, but don’t let that stop you. Because you’re making a difference in someone else’s life. You made a difference in my life, and I just wanted to let you know that

Santiago Leon
same here are like Ollie glow he’d from overcoming odds. I appreciate you coming on to the Selena productions podcast. Thank you.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai